Road to Code #35

Another update on learning to code.

Now I’m working on something called REST. REST (Representational State Transfer) isn’t a kind of code, but is a set of coding guidelines for how to build things where a client and user interact. Things like having a uniform interface throughout the entire thing you’re building, and having a base/starting URL that every other function you write extends from.

As I’ve gone through the course, there’s been a tension between going through the course fast (and feeling like I don’t completely understand things), vs going through the course slower (to be thorough, but delaying when I finish the course). I’ll set a goal for when I complete the course, but then end up slowing down.

I think I just need to speed up, and trust that whatever I don’t understand now, I’ll understand it later. After I finish the course I was already planning of watching all the videos again on double speed (which I do for most videos/podcasts). There’s 64 hours of video in the course, so I can watch 32 hours of double speed video over the course of several days. Then watch them all again. And then, I can go to youtube and watch those videos like “Learn HTML in 4 hours!” or “JavaScript: The Complete 12 Hour Course”. After that, anything else I need to learn can either be learned on the job, or learned over the course of a career in tech.

The work continues.

Road to Code #34

Another update on learning to code.

This week I finished up with EJS (or at least the parts dedicated to EJS). The major thing covered at the end here was what the instructor calls “partials” or “includes”. The idea with partials is to take code that needs to be on multiple pages (like a link to a code library, or the code for a navigation bar that’s on every page), and puts that on a separate page that you can reference with a short line. Doing this really shortens the code, and makes it more manageable.

If this course has hammered anything in, it’s that coders don’t actually remember a lot of stuff, and have to rely on online documentation to remember how to build different things. Developer friends have told me that, but I’ve seen it myself. The instructor for the course has been a web developer for years, and yet when he’s using a popular code framework (Bootstrap) to build a navigation bar, he needs to go to the Bootstrap website to look up their code for building it. If experienced coders have to look up things like that, I have zero chance of memorizing things as a new coder. This makes me less worried and more worried about being a developer.

The work continues.